Tarot Year Card (from Archetypal Tarot by Mary K. Greer)

For each year of your life, you have a card from the Major Arcana called the Tarot Year Card, which represents the tests and lessons you’ll experience in any given year. Your Tarot Year Card indicates the kind of archetypal energies that are constellated in that year, suggesting personal qualities you can work with.

In Archetypal Tarot (Weiser, 2021), Mary K. Greer connects astrology and numerology to the tarot to create an in-depth personality profile that can be used for self-realization and personal harmony.

This video workshop will explore Chapter 14 from Greer’s text. We’ll reflect on your Tarot Year Card from 2021 and write out forecasts for the year to come in 2022.

DOWNLOAD THE WORKSHEET HANDOUT

Your Tarot Year Card 2021 – 2022

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#only10decks The 10 decks I’d take with me

…to that stranded remote island where I will only ever be able to use these 10 decks for the rest of my mortal life. Or so goes the prompt. I may have embellished a little. Katey Flowers on Tarot Tube started the hashtag. You can watch her video here.

By the way, at the start of her video she says she was inspired by the makeup community’s tag “only 10 eyeshadow palettes” and I have to confess I kind of guffawed at the thought of “only” 10 eyeshadow palettes.. Ten…palettes? I don’t even have one! Ah but then I’m sure most of the known world would guffaw at my struggles over choosing just 10 decks for this prompt.

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Tarot History: Theories of Origin

I’m making an effort to complete the Holistic Tarot companion course video series. Here’s the ninth installment, on tarot history, or more specifically, theories of origin.

While there’s 33 pages of citations for the content of this video, I hope it’s clear that we’re still talking about speculation– hence theories of origins. I started this focused level of research back in 2014, even before Holistic Tarot was published, for a work of historical fantasy. Yes, a novel. That novel I’ve been struggling with, which I hope I can dedicate 2022 to.

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Tarot Court Cards Reimagined in the Spirit Keeper’s Tarot (Revelation Ed.)

Here’s a dedicated video in the 10-part orientation series just on the Empyrean Court. That video shares my intentions behind the renderings of the court cards in the Spirit Keeper’s Tarot and how I approach them, or at least quick, snapshot points on each card so that the video doesn’t get interminably long. =P

Or…

I am hopeful that you can simply transplant the way you currently read tarot court cards into the Revelation Edition, but for a few minor mental adjustments. Like just remember:

  • magic squares = Kings
  • shields = Queens
  • septagon elementals + horses = Knights
  • scrolls = Pages

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The Lost Tarot of Nostradamus

The Lost Tarot of Nostradamus brings together tarot divination and the 16th century prophetic writings of Michel de Nostradamus (1503 – 1566). The better known work by Nostradamus is Centuries, which began appearing around 1555 and has remained steadfastly popular, inspiring thousands of published commentaries and hundreds of translations.

In 1558, Nostradamus published a third edition of Centuries and posthumously, a last volume of the work was published as The Prophecies in 1568. Purportedly, 58 additional quatrains exist, but couldn’t be found after his death.

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Workshop at the California Institute of Integral Studies – Nov. 6, 2021

Smith-Waite Centennial Tarot

General Admission: $100
Generosity Rate: $125
Reduced Rate: $75

Sign up for an all-day online tarot workshop with me, via Zoom, and hosted by the California Institute of Integral Studies:

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

November 6, 2021
10 am – 5 pm
1 hr. break for lunch

Alchemical Tarot by Robert M. Place

I’m so excited to be conducting an all-day workshop at the Cal. Institute of Integral Studies. More than that, the admission rates go to support an incredible educational program. The Cal. Institute of Integral Studies does so much for the community, and gives sanctuary to brilliant, peculiar minds who otherwise have felt like they don’t belong anywhere else.

You can be a total tarot beginner or a seasoned practitioner. That’s because at the heart of it, this workshop is about where tarot card meanings come from, and the source of archetypes, instinct, and intuition. And yet tarot is very much an empirical, learned knowledge that asks for your focused study.

Terra Volatile Tarot by Credo quia Absurdum

This course is about both mysticism and philosophy. A semiotic study of the tarot means embodying both the mystic and the philosopher, and that’s what we’ll do through a series of collaborative reading exercises.

After an overview of history and the development of different tarot designs, along with a brief introduction to reading mechanics, we’ll explore techniques for cultivating transformative personal spirituality, from divinatory readings for yourself to birth cards and pathworking.

You’ll team up with classmates to workshop your personal readings. You’ll also be reading for each other, to hone professional cartomancy skills. I’ll share my insights and insider tips, acquired from two decades of experiences in reading tarot for others. Explore your role as a channel for guiding others toward attaining wisdom and an improved quality of life.

Zoomed in view of The Empress card in the Spirit Keeper’s Tarot (Revelation Ed. 2021)

Here’s a tentative rundown of the day’s schedule:

MORNING SESSION
10:00 am A Beginner’s Introduction to the Tarot
10:30 am History and Origins of the Cards
11:00 am Differing Tarot Designs and Systems
11:20 am Break – 10 minutes of guided relaxation (Video Clip)
11:30 am Sources and Evolution of Card Meanings
12:00 pm Philosophy, Psychology, and Mysticism
1:00 pm Lunch Break (1 hour)
1:30 pm Casual Tarot Chit-Chat (optional, if you prefer a 30 min. lunch)
AFTERNOON SESSION
2:00 pm The Mechanics of a Tarot Reading
2:30 pm Breakout Sessions
3:30 pm Break – 10 minutes of guided relaxation (Video Clip)
3:40 pm Reflections and Discussion
4:10 pm Your Tarot Archetypes and What They Reveal
4:45 pm Q & A Session
5:00 pm END

Saturday, Nov. 6

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Card from the Light Seer’s Tarot by Chris Anne

End of Empires Tarot (Majors) by Sarah Julig

It was through quite a bit of serendipity and social connections that I got my hands on the End of Empires Tarot, the Major Arcana series, by artist Sarah Julig. There are only 12 totally handmade copies of the first edition, each card hand-cut, glued together onto the card backs, and even the bag it came in was hand-made.

She auctioned off the 12 handmade tarot Majors decks and all proceeds went to BLM bail funds and the ACLU. That’s so cool!

The berry hues (red ink, blue watercolor, and vintage white tempera), ink blot reminiscent style, and eerie dream like quality altogether win me over. The art transports me to an alternate dimension, à la The Upside Down. Above is The Fool, Magician, Priestess, Empress, Emperor, and the Hierophant card in the bottom right corner features a human’s internal organs. An anatomical diagram for the Hierophant… now that intrigues!

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Tarot Cards: High Art or Low Art

Top, Left to Right: Oswald Wirth Tarot, Soprafino, RWS. Bottom: Convers TdM, Thoth, Spirit Keeper’s Tarot

Lately I’ve been pondering whether tarot card art is high art (i.e., fine art) or low art (because it’s considered illustration).

It’s hard to argue that tarot card illustrations are anything other than low art.

It was made intended to be functional, it’s commercialized, it’s a craft rather than a form of fine art, and it’s formulaic. So of course it’s low art.

And if it’s digitally done, then of course it’s low art. (Words in italics emphasized in an affected manner wrought with contempt. Of course.)

From The Cards (2021) by Patrick Maille

Plus, today tarot is by and large mass-produced, and as a mass-produced commodity, created with the intention of it appealing to as wide a market audience as possible. Many of the modern decks at the moment can even feel like kitsch art. Except… is kitsch art a form of high art? Even that is a question to ponder.

Image source: Il Meneghello, studio of hand-painted Italian tarots

Yet I’m equally unconvinced that the works of Il Meneghello isn’t a form of high art, even while it conforms to definitions of “low art,” such as it being a craft, functional, and formulaic in the sense that it’s reproducing a structured tarot deck.

The Rosetta Tarot

The Mary El Tarot. The Thoth Journey Tarot. The linework on the Tarot of the Abyss. The Dracxiodos Tarot, to me, is modern art that is fine art. Navigators of the Mystic Sea. Both the Rosetta Tarot and the Tabula Mundi. Or how about the Palekh miniature paintings commissioned specifically for the Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg deck?

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Tarocchi dei Celti (Tarot of the Celts) – Majors Only Deck

Tarocchi dei Celti, or Tarot of the Celts, is a Majors only deck published in Italian. The artwork is done by Italian illustrator Antonio Lupatelli (1930 – 2018), “evoking the ancient people of the Celts, with illustrations that are full of humor and sweetness” (thank you, Google Translate).

Laughs nervously. Okay, I’m wholly unqualified to be reviewing this deck. I have no idea what any of the key titles say, and when I tried typing the words into Google Translate, for instance with “Fintan mac Bochra,” the application tells me this phrase doesn’t exist in Italian, and in Arabic, allegedly it means “Venta is not good.” Not only is there the language barrier, there’s also the cultural barrier– I’m not all that familiar with Celtic mythology.

Ah, wait a minute– now if I type in a whole paragraph, the translation result is better. For Key 0 (il Matto), it’s Fintan mac Bóchra, and that’s a name. He was a Druid known as “The Wise.” I like that play of Fintan the Wise on the tarot Fool card. The salmon pictured on the card is a reference to Fintan being able to shape-shift into a salmon, and a reference to the Salmon of Knowledge in Irish lore.

As for the artwork, there’s certainly a whimsy to these illustrations. Of what I can read, note Morrigan for Key III (The Empress card). You may need to click on the above image file for a zoomed-in close-up view. Oh, and I’m guessing Key II (The High Priestess) is Brig or Brigid.

Due to a severe lacking in my knowledge of Celtic mythology, I’m not going to comment on any of the associations, so whether The Morrigan as the tarot Empress card makes any sense… I have neither the information nor knowledge to offer intelligent commentary. =)

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